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bolts that hold the mallet heads

So, i have noticed that a lot of folks use different techniques to secure mallet heads. The most common form is the bolt with a nut to hold it in place. I have seen some variation on this like using the nut on the inside of the head and stuff like that. But, why do we need such a large bolt. I'm not sure that it secures the head any better and it makes it kind of hard to reuse the shaft and creates a larger hole in the shaft, which might create more breaks in the mallets at that point . In T.O., I noticed that alexis from ottawa was using two drywall screws. This seems to make sense to me as they come out easy and hold the head in a manner that is more secure. I dropped of a couple of screws in the new heads and it seems to work really well. So, we will see but hey for now my mallet building time when down signficantly.

I use one metal screw and have no problems with it. I've used it on other mallets and they've all heald except one.

Edit: can't seem to post a photo...

so here's a link (Fixed Link... I think)

http://lh6.ggpht.com/king.georgec/SGQ09xVmL9I/AAAAAAAACf8/-VWdUenqUrI/DS...

 

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I like a recessed bolt head. Even though a big, honking, hex cap on one side and nut with a tail on the other doesn't seem to interfere with anyone else's play, I just can't help thinking that it must contact the ball at least sometimes.

 

My solution is to glue a short section of pipe inside the mallet head so I have more meat there. This both supports the shaft better top and bottom, and also allows me to counterbore the head for the allen head cap screw,  and thread the plastic to accept the bolt. Cut the bolt flush and voila! 

Retired.

Pictures? 

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Photobucket
That'd be neat, huh? Give me a mintue.

Retired.

What size and type is the inner pipe?  Looks like basic white PVC?

 

 

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I can't even remember. I think it's some variety of Poly Ethelene or another, left over from an earlier prototype attempt. It's 1 1/2" O.D. so it fits inside the 1 1/2" I.D. ABS. The materials are incompatible in that the ABS cement doesn't adhere to the PE. but there is a ski pole and a bolt going through it, so I don't care that much.

Retired.

Pieter from east van has the best set up i've seen. Everyone ask him nicely and maybe he will share his secret.

jagermeister and the philadelphia flyers now own the secret...

my original attempts has the hex nut and bolt, but in recent builds from lack of materials and general laziness, we've used drywall screws and a layer of duct tape have proved to work just fine

I use a heavy/thick (rated at 12g) 35mm screw, button head. It lasts longer than my mallet heads, have never had a problem.

 

Gives me a clean/smooth side for play and I can make (scraping) noise on the court with the top of the screw to either call for the ball or just generally make a bit of noise after a goal... whatever...

 

*Update* (So I'm not replying to my own post.)

Have already mentioned elsewhere that a player here (Ray) is a fitter and turner, he does nice stuff, made up a pair of 3 inch mallets this week.  3inches!?!?! yep, total length. very cute.

Tried playing with them too. 

 

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urbanbicyclist.org

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bikepolo.com.au
urbanbicyclist.org

i have a nut sticking out of both sides of the head speed = sparks when you shuffle lol

the mallets I've built are either with the 2" O.D. UHMWPE with a 1/4" wall thickness, or the 2.25" O.D. with a 3/16" thickness. I've found that by drilling through the top of the head, then a counter bore to make a pocket on the inside for the end of the pole to fit in - when secured by a bolt & nut all the way through the head and pole - is just about as bombproof as you can get. No wiggle whatsoever to put stress on the holes drilled into the plastic or the aluminum. As in Lucky's pic, I also like to counter bore the holes in the sides so that the bolt is recessed. If any sticks out, I either grind it down with a bench grinder, or just let it grind down on its own on the court.

In my experience, it is the shafts that need replacing all the time, and not the heads. So, I'm never too concerned with the bolt going through the ski pole getting stressed. Actually, I can't think of a single head that has broken or failed to be reused in some way in over a year since we've been building hardcourt mallets.

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If your heads are wearing faster than your shafts, you're slashing too much and shooting too little.

flip that. (but i agree)

so, you're saying that heads should be wearing out faster than shafts...? because I just can't see how. In the lifespan of a pole, what usually does it in eventually is by getting stuck in a wheel accidentally, or caught up some other way in someone's frame and get's bent all to shit, or broken.

Perhaps you meant flip the slashing and shooting part... 

{}------- lexington -------{}

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I think that is what he meant. While shafts do get broken, for my last couple of mallets I have changed the head up to a half dozen times before the shaft was so weakened by bending and unbending that it snapped in half. I guess it does depend on how rough your court surface is though, and how much mallet hacking, etc, goes on in a polo group.

yes, nick and i out west are used to the best T-1029 ski poles, because british columbia is the land of ski poles and is so rich right now that they throw them in the garbage when the colours don't match their land rovers. they do not break until they are pretty much snapped in half, you have to really fuck them up before they go.  since i moved to these i have only broken one, playing hard in east van three times a week, over many tournaments, and the force of it breaking made my hands sting.  really, if you can get them, you'll never go back-- they are the lightest and strongest thing out there.   that said, i go through heads about once every two weeks.  i like to keep my heads all the same for consistency in shooting and handling and that means changing them as soon as they wear down.   i travel to tournaments with four mallets for two days of play, i've learned the hard way that two is not enough.  four mallets and four spare heads.  i'll take some pictures of my bolt set-up, but it is such that i change heads in about thirty seconds court-side with standard allen keys and no wear on the shaft.  i have yet to find a better faster set-up that doesn't chew up the shafts, i make new heads in less than five minutes without a drill press.

So what are your all's heads made of? We're using nothing but the white stuff... UHMWPE. That material is tough as all hell. Perhaps that's why I've never seen one so much as get a stress crack, even when we've drilled the shit out of them to where they look like swiss cheese. On a recent trip to play the Dayton folks, they were breaking mallets left and right, but they were using ABS or something similar... I think we only had one suffer from a catastrophic bend in the pole.

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we use abs exclusively up in the north-west, the black stuff.  i don't ever break heads, only have once in a game on a brutal hit, they just wear down through each game.  i think the main difference between the stuff you use and the stuff i use is that mine is more slippery.  your white stuff is more resilient because it is less brittle, but much stickier.  i'm a ball handler and keep the mallet on the floor all the time, even without the ball, so a non-stick surface is essential.  as don cherry says, "kids-- keep your head up and keep your stick on the ice."   i've even been thinking about varnishing the bottoms to get that 'like new' sheen back.

I wouldn't try to make it too slick, varnish might cause it to slip out from under you when you are balancing - though that would be funny to see.

Also any varnish or shellac or other sovent-based finish will melt your ABS. Try surfboard/ski wax.

 

Chicago Bike Polo 2003-2008

St Louis Bike Polo 2008-now

Retired.

Most people I know use abs. It does wear fast but it is easy to find, inexpensive to buy, light, and super easy to work with. I think all this and more is covered in another forum though.

I use two screws as well, going in opposite sides, and they work fine. The only problem I run into is that after changing the head a few times the holes on the shaft get kind of widened, and to keep using different holes weakens the shaft. But by the time that becomes a problem the pole generally breaks from general stress anyways so I haven't worried too much about it so far. But I like the sound o f Lucky's setup and may give it a try.

Ya. 2 screws going in opposite directions works for me. I usually end up smashing my mallets in frustration before the heads wear out. Plus I'm super picky about my mallet heads. The slightest wear on the shooting surface and I'm thinking of switching out. 

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Although I recently started sawing off about 1/4 inch of tubing off each side once it starts to wear down. Fresh tubing for shooting is a must 

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fresh tubing for shooting?  am i in the wrong forum?  or am i in the *right* forum!

How can something that's wrong feel so right? 

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again, if i had a dime...

Thanks for the mallet man 

3...2...1...GO!

Mallets Of Mayhem Malletsmith

Tap threads through the pipe and pole.  Cut the head off a bolt, cut a notch in the end of a bolt with a dremel, and use a flathead to screw in the bolt.  Grind off any excess.

You have to go out of town to get inside jokes.
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themeansbikepolo.com
fixcraft

nice idea. 

{}------- lexington -------{}

{}------- lexington -------{}

I make them with a counter-sunk bolt and a thin nut.  Use a countersink bit for the head, and a spade bit to recess enough area for the nut (and the socket to tighten it with).  However, this wont work unless you are using material for the mallet head that can handle losing a few milimeters for the nut hole.  hah.

I like your idea too nick.